Oksana Wright and Charles DeMonaco discuss the management and corporate compliance measures for the companies to prioritize during the time of cost-cutting and uncertainty:

https://www.corporatecomplianceinsights.com/corporate-compliance-during-covid-19/

As proxy season approaches for a number of public companies, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and certain state authorities have taken steps to revise their current corporation laws or provide guidance for companies regarding the conduct of annual shareholder meetings in light of the COVID-19 outbreak. The SEC has provided relief for companies seeking

Let’s be honest, the only people usually concerned about business continuity plans (“BCP”) are compliance folks and the lawyers.  In fact, many probably have not looked at their BCP since Hurricane Sandy.  Well, you better dust it off (or dry it off, more accurately).

FINRA has already provided notice regarding traders working at home.  https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-03-09/finra-concedes-virus-may-impact-wall-street-oversight-of-traders. 

A chief compliance officer (“CCO”) for a registered investment adviser (“RIA”) found himself barred from any compliance or supervisory role in the future because he willfully refused to fix a number of compliance issues.  See https://www.sec.gov/litigation/admin/2017/34-82397.pdf. 

The RIA had conducted a review that uncovered numerous compliance problems.  Despite having notice of the results of this

The SEC recently put out an Investor Bulletin on wrap fees. Although this guidance is steered toward consumers, there are lessons to be learned by firms who offer such programs.

The SEC specifically posed the question of what does the fee cover. Included in that list of possibilities are:

  1. Investment advice.
  2. Brokerage costs.

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The SEC recently announced an enforcement initiative that will target retail investor harm. The agency’s task force will use data analytics to find widespread problems regarding fee disclosures and unsuitable investment recommendations. In addition to data analytics, the SEC will rely upon tips, complaints and referrals that come into the SEC.

This heightened analysis of

The SEC has recently issued an Investor Alert regarding commentary provided about investors from what appear to be independent sources. It turns out, many of those independent sources are not independent at all. Instead, they are paid shills.

The SEC has instituted enforcement actions against such companies for generating deceptive articles on investment websites.