Most brokers despise the fact that they need to re-take their examinations if they are not employed with a broker-dealer for 2 years or if they are not associated with a member firm.   Now, FINRA comes to the rescue with a new proposal to permit registered representatives to avoid re-taking their exams for up to 7 years so long as they fulfill continuing education requirements.  See http://www.finra.org/sites/default/files/rule_filing_file/SR-FINRA-2017-007.pdf.

The proposal also allows a person associated with a member firm to obtain any qualification and registration permitted by the member firm regardless of current need at the member firm, and FINRA will also create a new Securities Industries Essentials exam for those who are not associated with a member firm.  These individuals, who pass the SIE, may then take a second specific exam if they join a member firm.

Although this is great step by FINRA, it is not a guarantee that it will be approved so we will continue to monitor the situation to see if changes occur.

 

Despite numerous warnings, some people just do not get it.   The SEC barred a broker from the industry because the broker used personal email and text messages to obtain client investments.  See the Commission’s website.

The SEC found these personal communications were never submitted to the firm for review.  As a result, the broker aided and abetted his firm’s books and records violations.  Further, the broker also made numerous other violations as well.

This scenario demonstrates the critical requirement to only use firm sponsored media for client communications.

 

Over the last several months, the SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (“OCIE”) has been conducting a “sweep examination” of over 70 broker-dealers and investment advisers to assess their cybersecurity policies and procedures.  https://www.sec.gov/files/observations-from-cybersecurity-examinations.pdf.  In particular, OCIE looked at their preparedness regarding governance and risk assessment; access rights and controls; data loss prevention; vendor management; training; and incident response.

For the most part, OCIE found policies and procedures in place, and these firms did, in fact, conduct penetration tests and vulnerability scans; used a system to prevent data loss; installed software patches; adopted response plans; and conducted vendor risk assessments.  However, all the news was not good.  OCIE believes that these firms should have better tailored policies and procedures; conduct enhanced employee training; replace outdated systems; and make sure that various vulnerabilities were addressed in a timely fashion.  OCIE also informed these firms that it will continue to be vigilant in the cybersecurity sphere in both its examinations and testing.

In sum, with the exception of tweets from the White House, no area is getting more attention from the public and the government than cybersecurity precautions and detection.  It is critical that senior management and compliance at broker-dealers and investment advisers take this threat seriously or there could be serious repercussions if their business is attacked.

The CEO of FINRA recently announced that FINRA plans to provide firms with additional resources to deal with recidivist brokers. So what does this mean?

For years, FINRA’s exam priorities have focused on, among other things, brokers who are repeat violators of FINRA rules. FINRA has made this a priority as a way to weed out brokers who do not deserve to be in the industry because they are likely causing more harm than good.

FINRA is effectively asking the firms to do their part in cleansing the industry of bad brokers. What can a firm do in this regard?

First, firms must take more care in the hiring process. Your due diligence cannot begin and end by pulling the registered representative’s CRD. You should run a Google (or similar) style search on the broker. There are also services you can use to find out if there are judgments, liens or lawsuits against the broker. This way, you can find red flags that may not appear on CRD.

Second, once you hire the broker, you have to make sure he/she is coming under a robust supervisory and compliance overview. Be proactive if you sense there is a problem. By doing do, even if there is a problem, you may be able to cut it off before it gets worse.

There is no easy solution. From FINRA’s perspective, however, you are either part of the solution or part of the problem. The choice is yours.